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Assessment 
 
RELATED INFORMATION

Testing is assessment, but assessment is not necessarily testing. School board members are responsible for knowing how the district’s schools are performing and enacting responsive policies in turn. Getting a real sense of how and why students are learning can require creative approaches. Conventional testing, while valuable, cannot possibly give the whole picture. Nor can it be done often enough to be a good indicator of how the newest policies are working.

School boards and administrators need to find other ways, suited to their districts, to listen to feedback from teachers, students, parents, and community members. Putting in place a broad-based assessment program will help the district make continuous improvement a habit.

  • Why is assessment important in SMT education?
  • What are we assessing?
  • How should schools balance assessment and testing?
  • How have other districts addressed assessment?
  • How can I get my board talking about this?


Why is assessment important in SMT education?

 What are we assessing?

How should schools balance assessment and testing?

How have other districts addressed assessment?

Several Kansas and Missouri board members offer creative suggestions for ways to assess programs.

How can I get my board or community talking about this? 




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